Use Never10 to Block Your PC from Auto-Upgrading to Windows 10

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Shortly after I finished writing my previous post dealing with my way of blocking the pesky Get Windows 10 (or GWX) app using the awesome WinPatrol family of tools, I stumbled upon Steve Gibson’s free utility called Never 10.

Never10

Never10 deals with the voluntary/forced upgrade to Windows 10 in a more elegant way, setting just the right keys in the Windows Registry to their correct values.

Never10 is completely free and portable. Download and run it to see whether your system could be available for a free upgrade to Windows 10.

If it isn’t, you will see the following message:

Never10 — Windows 10 Upgrade Is Disabled

Never10 — Windows 10 Upgrade Is Disabled

On the other hand, in case your system could be updated to Windows 10, you will see this message:

Never10 — Windows 10 Upgrade Is Enabled

Never10 — Windows 10 Upgrade Is Enabled

In that case click on the Disable Win10 Upgrade button.

Remove the GWX Folder

I disabled the upgrade option on my system and, consequently, decided to remove the C:\Windows\System32\GWX folder and all it’s contents.

Unfortunately, nine files could not be removed easily.

Access denied to GWX files

Access denied to GWX files

The nine files I were unable to remove in Windows Explorer using the Shift+Del keyboard shortcut, were:

To remove them I had to use the free and portable Unlocker.

Use Unlocker to delete the remaining GWX files, one by one

Use Unlocker to delete the remaining GWX files, one by one

The process was successful and I was able to remove each one of the nine remaining files, one by one.

Unlocker successfuly removes the GWX files

Unlocker successfuly removes the GWX files

Check Your Windows Updates

Then, I decided to test Never10. I went to Control Panel > System and Security > Windows Update and clicked the Check for updates link to see whether I would be served again with the multi-gigabyte download of Windows 10.

It turns out that I wasn’t. Never10 seems to have done a good job at telling Microsoft that I don’t want to upgrade my system.

But just in case, I still have my WinPrivacy and WinAntiRansom settings in place…

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